Daniel Suarez

Thursday October 01, 2015


daniel-suarez

 

Daniel Suarez

GESA 2013  |  Canada  |  Social Scientist

 

I am interested in the relationships between our knowledge and value systems, political institutions, and socio-ecologies.

I am currently a PhD student at UC Berkeley with the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management (ESPM). My research explores what it means to put monetary values on nature, and the implications for environmental politics, policy-making, and practice. I use mixed ethnographic methods to pursue this idea in its various forms through transnational policy networks and across different sites, scales, and institutional contexts of environmental governance.

Participant observation as part of a “Collaborative Event Ethnography” of the 10th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD/COP10) in Nagoya.

Participant observation as part of a “Collaborative Event Ethnography” of the 10th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD/COP10) in Nagoya.

Growing up in Vancouver, Canada, I developed an interest in conservation and environmental issues. I participated in eclectic research projects before starting my doctoral program, including studying rainbow trout populations in central British Columbia, monitoring marine sanctuaries in the Philippines, analyzing the ritual of restaurant tipping, doing ethnographic work with forest governance experts, and more recently conducting participant observation research at UN environmental summits. I’ve become increasingly interested in the cultural and political dimensions of environmental issues—an interest which motivates my current work. I recall a passage written by Donald Worster:

Natural science alone cannot by itself fathom the sources of the crisis it has identified, for the sources lie not in the nature that scientists study but in the human nature and, especially, in the human culture … We are facing a global crisis today not because of how ecosystems function, but rather because of how our ethical systems function.

Daniel and Katja Heubach (2011) conducted Collaborative Participant Observation at IPBES 2 with funding from the Alumni Innovation Fund. Read her blog post on the experience here.

One comment

  1. […] Dan Suarez is a doctoral candidate in Environmental Science, Policy & Management (ESPM) at UC Berkeley, with training in anthropology, geography, and conservation biology. His dissertation explores the contemporary politics and rising influence of ecosystem services in biodiversity conservation. […]

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