Carlos Ivan Zambrana Flores

Friday October 02, 2015


carlos-ivan-zambrana-flores

 

Carlos Ivan Zambrana Flores

GESA 2012  |  Bolivia  |  Conservation Biologist

 

I hope to better influence Bolivian politics and policies on biodiversity and climate change, break the status quo in order to radically shift the regime of environmental governance in Bolivia for a more resilient future, and setting an example to the world.

Bolivia is experiencing a rapid reconfiguration of its legal, economic and political foundations as a Plurinational State in great part due to the struggle of Indigenous peoples, while adverse climate events that affect them the most are becoming increasingly common and extreme. In the context of these challenges, a new and effective Biodiversity regime within a Mother Earth framework is urgently needed. This new regime needs to jumpstart the development and implementation of multi-level governance schemes that enable communities and all sectors and scales of the State, to share responsibilities and work together to effectively cope with the impacts of global climate change. But the Bolivian context is intrinsically so complex that viable solutions must be endogenously designed, using a solid scientific basis and from a good understanding of the country’s cultural dynamics.

In public service, my goal is to transform the obsolete national regime on biodiversity and climate change coming from an integrative Mother Earth approach. In other words, I want to contribute in the construction of a regime that acknowledges our plurinational condition and that is congruent with a the diversity of life systems that are present in the country, enabling the emergence of diverse local management schemes, and strengthening the resilience of indigenous communities to climate impacts through their local institutions and practices.

In academia, I intend to carry out research on different aspects of political ecology in Bolivia, to help build a transdisciplinary approach to effectively tackle the complexity imposed by climate change issues, particularly from a eco-socialist perspective. Currently, my doctorate thesis is provisionally entitled Indigenous Biodiversity Governance and Climate Change in Bolivia: Looking for Effective Solutions in a Complex Landscape.

In education, I will continue working as a professor in order to train Bolivian undergraduate and graduate students so they can creatively and propose new paradigms based on effective local governance that replace the prevalent policies based on insufficient “command-and-control”, ineffective “top-down”, and narrow “cost-benefit” approaches to environmental problems.

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